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March Heroes of the Virginia State Police

“Remembering & Honoring Our Heroes

Who gave the Ultimate Sacrifice in March”

The Colonel C. W. Woodson Memorial Gallery located in the Virginia State Police Academy is dedicated to those members of the Virginia State Police and their predecessors, the inspectors of the Division of Motor Vehicles, who gave their lives in the preservation of law and order, and who, in so doing, lived and died in the best traditions of law enforcement's duty and service to mankind.  The Woodson Memorial Gallery proudly displays the portraits of seven Virginia Troopers who lived their lives by this tradition and by the Trooper's Pledge down to the very letter and who in the month of March gave the Ultimate Sacrifice protecting and serving the citizens of our State and Country.

 

Trooper Charles Eugene Morris, EOW: 3/2/1962

Trooper Junius A. Walker, EOW: 3/7/2013
Inspector Curtis Lee Wood, EOW: 3/11/1929

License Examiner Charles E. Hagerman, EOW: 3/17/1943

Trooper Harry Lee Henderson, EOW: 3/17/1987

Sergeant Charles William Puckett, EOW: 3/28/1938

Trooper Chad P. Dermyer, EOW: 3/31/2016

 

We will always remember and honor them for how they lived and served.

God Bless our Heroes!

 

IN MEMORIAL

"It is not how these officers died that made them heroes, it is how they lived."
National Law Enforcement Officers MemorialWashington, D.C.

 

Trooper Charles Eugene Morris
End of Watch: March 2, 1962
Division VI - Patrick County

     The Virginia State Police Family remembers and honors the service and life of Trooper Charles Eugene Morris.  He was a native Virginian from Carroll County, Virginia.  He served four years as a State Trooper protecting and serving the Citizens of Patrick County and the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Tragically on March 2, 1962, Trooper Morris gave his life in the preservation of law and order, and who in so doing lived and died in the best traditions of law enforcement's duty and service to mankind.

     Trooper Morris had responded to the scene of a domestic disturbance to assist the Patrick County Sheriff's Office in making an arrest. Together, Trooper Morris and deputies were attempting to arrest a man who was hiding in a field near his house. The man opened fire with a 20 gauge shotgun striking Trooper Morris twice. Trooper Morris died shortly afterwards at Stuart Hospital.  Trooper Charles Eugene Morris became the 24th Virginia State Police Trooper to give the Ultimate Sacrifice while protecting and serving the Citizens of Virginia.

     Trooper Morris was a Loyal and Faithful member of the Virginia Department of State Police who served in accordance to the Trooper's Pledge.

A true Virginia Hero.

Trooper Morris' memory lives and his service inspires.

Rest in Peace Brother.

 



Master Trooper Junius Alvin Walker, Badge # 802
Division I - Dinwiddie County
End of Watch: March 7, 2013

 

     Today and every day the Virginia State Police Family Remembers and Honors the service and dedication of Trooper Junius Alvin Walker, who 7 years ago, gave his life in the preservation of law and order, and who in so doing lived and died in the best traditions of law enforcement's duty and service to mankind.  We honor Trooper Walker's life of service to his Community of Dinwiddie County, the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Nation.

     Trooper Walker loved serving the people of Dinwiddie County where he was assigned for the last 27 years of his 40 year tour of duty with the Virginia State Police.  Trooper Walker so cared and was so concerned about the well-being of the people he served that he would check on victims of crime and those involved in motor vehicle accidents even if he was not involved in investigating the incident himself.  Trooper Walker's life of service included serving the Commonwealth of Virginia as a State Trooper and serving the Nation as a member of the U. S. Army Reserves.

     Trooper Walker is remembered as a humble protector of the public who mentored many officers in his 40-year career -- a large man who had a gentle touch.  State Police Superintendent W. Steven Flaherty said, "Trooper Walker was built like a grizzly bear, but he had the disposition of a teddy bear.  Flaherty said that Walker was a man of excellent character and "unshakable integrity."  Governor Bob McDonnell said Walker "touched an amazing amount of people" and "truly had the heart of a servant."

     Sadly and tragically, on Thursday, March 7, 2013, at approximately 1:30 p.m., Trooper Junius Walker stopped to check on the well-being of a motorist stopped along southbound I-85, near mile marker 45, in Dinwiddie County in what appeared to be a disabled vehicle.  The individual that Trooper Walker intended to help opened fire with a 308 rifle shooting Trooper Walker multiple times killing him as he sat in his patrol car.

     Trooper Walker became the 59th Virginia State Trooper to give the ultimate sacrifice while protecting and serving the Citizens of Virginia.

     Trooper Walker was a father of three children and a husband of 32 years.

     While Trooper Walker is missed every day, his memory lives and his life of service stands as an inspiration for all that currently serve and those that will follow into the future.

     Thank you, Trooper Junius A. Walker, for your service and example.

You are our Hero.

Rest in Peace Brother.



Trooper (Inspector) Curtis Lee Wood
End of Watch:  March 11, 1929
Division V - Lee Hall, Virginia

 

     Today and always, the Virginia State Police Family remembers and honors the life and service of Inspector Curtis Lee Wood, who gave his life in the preservation of law and order, and who in so doing lived and died in the best traditions of law enforcement's duty and service to mankind.  Inspector Wood patrolled Virginia's highways by motorcycle waging unceasing war against crime in all its forms.  His goal was to make Virginia and the Country a safer place to live and to operate a motor vehicle.

 

     On March 11, 1929, while pursuing a suspected drunk driver his motorcycle was hit causing him to fall off.  His injuries resulted in his death and Inspector Curtis Lee Wood became the 3rd Virginia State Police Officer to die in the line of duty.

 

     Inspector Wood's memory lives on and his service and dedication inspires us today.

 

Rest in Peace brother.


Remembering and Honoring
License Examiner Charles E. Hagerman, Badge # 197
End of Watch: 03/17/43

     Today and always, the Virginia State Police Family is Remembering and Honoring License Examiner Charles E. Hagerman’s life of service and dedication to serving the Citizens of Virginia and the Nation.  He served the Citizens of Virginia as a License Examiner with the Virginia State Police and he served the Nation as a soldier in War World II.

     Tragically, on March 17, 1943, while protecting our freedom in World War II, License Examiner Charles E. Hagerman was reported as Missing in Action.  License Examiner Charles E. Hagerman became the 11th Virginia State Police Officer to give the Ultimate Sacrifice in the Line of Duty to his fellow man.

     License Examiner Charles E. Hagerman is a Hero for the way he lived his life, serving and protecting the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Nation at home and in World War II with dedication and commitment.

     Thank you for your service Brother.

Rest in Peace.

 

Trooper Harry Lee Henderson, Badge # 749
Division II - Warren County
End of Watch: 3/17/1987

     Please join the members of the Virginia State Police Association and the Virginia Department of State Police as we Remember and Honor the life and service of Trooper Harry Lee Henderson.  Trooper Henderson served the Citizens of Virginia as a State Trooper for 14 years.  He also served his community leading, inspiring and mentoring others to success.  He served as a Boy Scout leader for 22 years where he inspired young men to greatness.  He was a model Trooper who lived and served in accordance with the Trooper's Pledge always striving to make his state and country a safer and better place in which to live.  Trooper Henderson was described as the "Beloved Trooper" in an article, "Beloved state trooper remembered 30 years after tragic death," which was published by the Royal Examiner on March 17, 2017.

     Tragically on March 17, 1987, in the early morning hours of Saint Patrick's Day, Virginia State Police Trooper Harry Lee Henderson was killed when his patrol vehicle was struck by a tractor-trailer on the side of I-66 where he had a car stopped on the shoulder in Warren County.  Trooper Henderson became the 42nd Virginia State Police Trooper to die in the line of duty.

     Thank you for your service, dedication and inspiration Trooper Henderson.

 

Rest in Peace Brother.


Sergeant Charles William Puckett, Badge # 57
Division IV - Russell County
Duty-Related Illness
EOW: on March 28, 1938

 

     We will never forget the service and sacrifice of Sergeant Charles William Puckett...

     Sergeant Charles William Puckett's drive to serve and to protect helped to establish the reputation and the foundation of the Virginia Department of State Police. He strived always to make his state and country a safer place in which to live and he waged unceasing war against crime in all its forms.

     And on March 28, 1938 Sergeant Charles William Puckett paid the ultimate sacrifice protecting and serving the Citizens of Virginia, becoming the 7th Virginia State Police Officer to die in the line of duty, when he succumbed to pneumonia contracted while pursuing and arresting an individual wanted for murder in Southwest Virginia.

     Sergeant Charles William Puckett's memory lives and his service inspires law enforcement officers today.

     Thank you Brother for your service!

Rest in Peace Brother.



Remembering and Honoring
Trooper Chad Phillip Dermyer, Badge # 756
Division I - City of Richmond
End of Watch: March 31, 2016

 

     Today and every day the Virginia State Police Family Remembers and Honors the service and dedication of Trooper Chad Phillip Dermyer who gave his life in the preservation of law and order, and who in so doing lived and died in the best traditions of law enforcement's duty and service to mankind.  Trooper Dermyer served the Nation as a law enforcement officer and as a U.S. Marine.

     Trooper Dermyer graduated from the Virginia State Police Academy in November 2014 as a member of the 122nd Basic Session.  Prior to joining the Virginia State Police, Chad served as a Police Officer with the Newport News Police Department, with the Jackson, Michigan, Police Department, and with the United States Department of Veterans Affairs Police.  Prior to law enforcement, Chad served the Nation as a U.S. Marine for four years.

     On Thursday, March 31, 2016 Trooper Chad Dermyer was participating in an interdiction training exercise at the Greyhound Bus Station in the City of Richmond.  At approximately 2:40 p.m. Trooper Dermyer engaged a male subject just inside the front doors of the bus station in conversation.  During the course of talking with the male subject, the male pulled out a handgun and shot Trooper Dermyer multiple times.  Trooper Dermyer was rushed to VCU Medical Center where he died from his injuries.  Trooper Dermyer became the 62nd Virginia State Trooper to make the ultimate sacrifice while protecting and serving the Citizens of Virginia.

     Trooper Dermyer is remembered as a man of honor and integrity who loved serving and protecting the Citizens of Virginia.  He is remembered by his fellow officers as an experienced, incredibly knowledgeable and talented police officer.  More importantly, Chad loved his family and is remembered as a wonderful father of two children and a loving and devoted husband.

     On the evening of March 31, 2016, Governor Terry McAuliffe's statement regarding the loss of Trooper Chad Dermyer included:

"Dorothy and I are heartbroken by the senseless death of Virginia State Trooper Chad Dermyer, who died serving in the line of duty today in Richmond.  Like so many brave Virginia men and women, Trooper Dermyer put on a uniform and risked his life every day to keep us safe, first as a U.S. Marine and then as a police officer. He was a husband, a father and a hero who was taken from us too soon."

     Virginia State Police Superintendent Colonel W. Steven Flaherty praised Dermyer’s work as a law enforcement officer and as a trooper with the State Police.  He said that Dermyer proved every day, on duty and off duty, that he had what it takes to be in law enforcement. “He had integrity, fortitude, character, and lord knows, he had compassion for other people.” He also said that Dermyer has a sixth sense, the power of observation, a skill which tragically led to him paying the ultimate price.  “Chad was doing what Chad loved to do and was at his absolute best” that tragic day at the bus station.

     While Trooper Dermyer is missed everyday his memory lives and his life of service stands forever as an inspiration for us all.

     Thank you Trooper Chad Dermyer for your service and the example you gave us to live and to serve by.

You are our Hero!

Rest in Peace Brother.